Holiday in the Sun

I come from a family of devoted vacationers. Like those before me, I thirst for a relaxing and equally exciting break from the hustle and bustle of modern living. For me a vacation is a period of time set aside to heal and rejuvenate my body, an opportunity to post better Instagram pictures (Kidding…or I am?), a warning to cease all calls with the insurance company and pharmacies (I know they’ll miss me), and a moment to just enjoy being alive with the people I love most.

My husband Peter and I just returned from a break with my family in sunny Florida. We had a great trip, and it’s bittersweet coming home and jumping back into the reality of our lives. All those phone calls I didn’t make were still waiting for me as we drove home, but I missed my cat so by the time we hit the Ohio state line I was eager for familiarity.

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Here’s my guide to vacationing:

p a c k i n g

Preparing for vacation with CF is an unique adventure to say the least. When packing, I usually gather all my medication and equipment first before packing any other items since they are the priority when space inevitably starts to run low. On this trip, I brought both my vests, two weeks of medication in a 7-Pack pill box, two nebulizer machines, six nebulizer cups, extra nebulizer tubing, a mini sharps container for needles and diabetes lancets, my glucometer and supplies, microwave sterilizer bags to clean my nebulizer cups, and the rest of my human things.

Am I too prepared? I understand it sounds a little extreme to bring two nebulizers, but I can’t explain the sheer panic that wells up in your body when your nebulizer dies while you’re out-of-state. Been there, done that. #neveragain

I wouldn’t consider myself a light packer. Yeah, I am pretty sure I am the complete opposite of a light packer. It comes with the territory of a chronic illness and someone who owns six bathing suits. It used to bother me that I could never spontaneously pick up and wanderlust my way through the world (I could but we would have to strap my vest to Peter’s back, and that’s just cruel and unusual punishment).

Now I realize, I still have the physical ability to leave as long as I bring my “baggage”, and that’s all that matters. You have to learn to adjust in life. For me, bringing all the necessities stings less when I remember my friends with CF on the transplant list not being able to venture beyond a 3-hour radius of the hospital. I am grateful for my freedom, as always.

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t r a v e l i n g

Since we decided to drive to Florida and would be stuck in the car for extended periods of time listening to the audio book, The Life We Bury, I had to do my treatments on the go. Using the cigarette lighter with the help of a power inverter to complete my nebulized drugs, I used my Afflovest which is battery powered for therapy. Each time before turning on the nebulizer, l silently prayed I wouldn’t blow up Peter’s car en route. I just know that wouldn’t be a good situation for our marriage. Also, the Afflovest looks like a throwback early 90s child life jacket, and I am positive the nearby cars thought I was sporting just that. My advice to myself: throw them the peace sign and crank up Justin Bieber. #belieber

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t r e a t m e n t s

One of my favorite times during vacation is sitting down each morning, coffee in hand, to do my treatments in the sun. Something about the change of scenery makes the entire process a little less daunting and mundane. I am always rushing during my normal routine, so the chance to leisurely complete my treatments surrounded by my family members seemed like a vacation in itself.

I warned my family prior to our trip that we would be completing one page each day from Start Where You Are: A Journal for Self-Exploration (Meera Lee Patel). Most members obliged during morning treatments, and it was so great to hear about everyone’s hopes for the future, what they valued most, and their perceptions of themselves. I enjoy learning about people in anyway I can, so I really love how this book allows you to ask the important questions.

t h r e a d s 

If we are being honest with ourselves, CF bellies are the absolute worst. I’ll never understand why scrawny arms and legs are partnered with obvious stomach distention in this disease. For all the coughing we do, we should be rewarded with rock hard abdominals. That’s not reality, though. Oh, well. To give myself a waist and the illusion of hips, I rely on wearing high-waisted bottoms while combing the beach or relaxing in the pool at the house. They are the absolute best when mixed with flash tattoos that even my grandma loved sporting on the beach. #buddahbelly

Just below my top on my rib sits my portacath as part of my tropical uniform. I know people probably stared and were left to puzzle what purpose the bionic bump serves. Truthfully, I am more indebted to that port for helping me than I will ever be to a stranger’s critical eye. It’s important for me to remember that. So, I wear my port with the utmost pride because beauty is not only skin deep.

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h e a l i n g

Even though I had taken time off from work, adventured on kayaks, and spent most my days collecting freckles in the sun, the reality is that a vacation from CF just doesn’t exist. About half way through our trip, I felt my body beginning to break down and slow down. Due to breathing in the naturally salty air and too much mermaiding (probably), Wednesday night I started coughing up blood which is very normal in CF, but less normal for me. My mom, who can detect my unique cough in a grocery store during flu season, came into my room and suggested it was time to drink tea and rest. After a night in bed reading A Life in Men (Gina Frangello) and stopping my inhaled sodium chloride treatments for a couple days (CFers inhale salt water to restore moisture in our lungs and help clear them), I felt better and restored.

Slowing down and yielding to the healing process of CF, especially on vacation, can seem impossible. I suffer from an extreme case of FOMO (fear of missing out) with my family which causes me to push myself, sometimes beyond my limits. I am still learning to find the right balance between experiencing, managing, and healing in my little world of chronic disease. A holiday in the sun always serves as a good reminder to slow down and enjoy your time doing whatever you are doing. Embrace the JOMO (joy of missing out).

Thanks for a great trip, Florida! I miss my family, the dolphins, and early bird karaoke already. The restoration before the busy spring and summer is exactly what we needed.

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3 thoughts on “Holiday in the Sun

  1. Sophie says:

    Loved reading about your holiday adventures can relate so much to you! Especially that feeling of when I nebuliser dies when you’re away from home! How do I find you on Facebook and Instagram?? Xxx

    Like

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